Tysabri IVIG Acthar Personal Trainer

I saw my neurologist today who confirmed that I have oscillopsia
with a slight horizontal Nystagmus; it is very settle though. He saw it with
his ophthalmoscope (I think that is what it is called) so that to me illustrates
how subtle it is. Anyways, as I presumed, nothing I can do but wait. He said I
have obviously improved since last time so I should not worry.
They got me on the phone with the Acthar people and it is
being shipped to arrive Thursday. That is what I think will help the most in my
visual recovery which will help everything else like a domino effect so I am
eager for that.
My neurologist also got me on the phone with a personal
trainer he likes. Not a physical therapist, a personal trainer. He feels I am
past what physical therapy can do for me and have to start pushing it further
which I am all for. So I see him tomorrow for an evaluation. He does house
calls so that is good since I can not drive right now haha…

While I received my 26th  infusion of Tysabri I talked to the IVIG
people on the phone. Looks like I will have a nurse here on Friday to infuse my
IVIG over an action packed 6 hours! Hey this is good. Personal trainer
tomorrow, Acthar on Thursday and IVIG on Friday. You can’t really attack MS any
more aggressively than that haha!

3 Responses to Tysabri IVIG Acthar Personal Trainer

  1. AP says:

    Hey Matt,
    My name is Aishani, and I am a student at Loma Linda University currently taking an occupational therapy class with Sharon Pavlovich. Sharon shared your blog with us in class, and I have to say Thank you so much for sharing your story and journey. I felt that you were very expressive and by reading your blogs there were times when my heart got heavy which only confirmed that you are a good writer. I liked how you add a touch of humor to your post and keep the go getter attitude. I read in one of your post you commented that you have laugh through things even though when its gets tough. I can't feel the pain that you go through with that smile on your face, but it definitely shows the courage of living the life.

    I am also taking Sensorimotor class this quarter and learning a lot about nystagmus, but your particular blogs- Double Vision – Diplopia in Multiple Sclerosis, What is Nystagmus? Shaking Eyes?, and What is Oscillopsia? Shaking Vision? helped a lot to put things in to perspective. I like how you have researched and wrote your blogs as a clinical examples for MS. Hope many people can read and get the enthusiasm of life from you.

  2. AP says:

    Hey Matt,
    My name is Aishani, and I am a student at Loma Linda University currently taking an occupational therapy class with Sharon Pavlovich. Sharon shared your blog with us in class, and I have to say Thank you so much for sharing your story and journey. I felt that you were very expressive and by reading your blogs there were times when my heart got heavy which only confirmed that you are a good writer. I liked how you add a touch of humor to your post and keep the go getter attitude. I read in one of your post you commented that you have laugh through things even though when its gets tough. I can't feel the pain that you go through with that smile on your face, but it definitely shows the courage of living the life.

    I am also taking Sensorimotor class this quarter and learning a lot about nystagmus, but your particular blogs- Double Vision – Diplopia in Multiple Sclerosis, What is Nystagmus? Shaking Eyes?, and What is Oscillopsia? Shaking Vision? helped a lot to put things in to perspective. I like how you have researched and wrote your blogs as a clinical examples for MS. Hope many people can read and get the enthusiasm of life from you.

  3. Aishani,
    Glad you found it helpful. I was explaining to Sharon that right now my blog is a mess because I started striopping it down to redo it and make it easier to navigate vut befor I was able to put anything back up my vision fell apart so now it's.. not what it is supposed to be?

    Regarding my posts on nystagmus and oscillopsia. I know what it is, medically speaking, but though I can EASILY explain the neurology/anatomy behind it all, it's STILL very difficult for me to explain properly what it LOOKS like. It's like trying to explain what a color looks like that no one can see but me. How can I communicate a color to someone who can only see colors made up of red, blue and yellow?

    Thanks for the comment!

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